The heartbreaking tales of teachers earning $320/week and buying classroom supplies or feeding students should finally lay to rest the lie that teacher unions are all-powerful and have a stranglehold on American democracy. Nothing could be further from the truth, as evidenced by the pay and funding crisis rolling across red state America.

Arizona teacher: Daughter makes more as a nanny — CNN Video

The only way Americans will wake up to the American crisis in funding and teacher pay is for every teacher in America to go on strike. Yes, I mean it. Shut the sucker down!

In 2012, I wroteabout how the Education Minister in an Australian state said something that offended teachers and how the entire system went on strike and took to the streets until he apologized.

25,000 teachers stayed home, 10,000 marched on Parliament and they closed 150 public schools. Parents were politely alerted in advance to make other plans for the day. Many principals supported the strike and even marched with their colleagues.

Click above for news coverage of the strike

Teachers in Australia are not human piñata or professional victims. They don’t fundraise for crayons. They stand up for themselves, their students and their communities. Aussie educators enjoy medical insurance, secure pensions and enjoy long-service leave.

(Read Throw a Few Million American Teachers on the Barbie)

Don’t you dare tell me that it is illegal for teachers to strike. One thing I learned working in civilized countries, like Australia, is that there is no such thing as an illegal strike. It is a basic human right to withhold one’s labor, otherwise we are slaves.

It is time to fully wake up!

At the risk of being accused of blaming the victim, teachers have brought some of this upon themselves. Every time a teacher dismissed the role of organized labor, begged for a freebie, just followed orders, was a cheerleader on standardized testing day, failed to question the Common Core/Race-to-the-Top/No Child Left Behind, held a fundraiser for copy paper, enforce a zero-tolerance policy, or dress unprofessionally, they contributed to the neglect that America is finally becoming aware of. When teachers send their own kids to a charter school or believe that they are just like public schools, only better, they contribute to $320/week salaries. When teachers allow their voices to fall silent on matters of curriculum, assessment, calendar, or working conditions, they create the conditions for classrooms that insult the humanity of their students.

Fight, damn it! You are all that stands between kids and the madness! If you won’t fight for your own dignity and paycheck, how can we trust you to create the most productive context for learning? Go to a damned school board meeting and speak up! It is literally, the least you can do.

Normalizing deprivation

Over the past several years, I have written several articles about how common practices contribute to normalizing educational deprivation and impoverishment. We live in the richest nation in the history of the earth. Our students deserve better. So do their teachers.

Re-read and share…

 

Thoughts and Prayers Don’t Save Lives, student lie-in at the White House to protest gun laws. Author: Lorie Shaull

The clarity, courage, and commitment of the young people fighting to end school violence and ban assault weapons provides an opportunity to support kids who wish to change the world.

Here are two books I heartily recommend for teenagers.

Here Comes Trouble: Stories from My Life by Michael Moore.

Set your politics aside. It doesn’t matter whether you love or hate Michael Moore, his autobiography is deeply moving and wildly entertaining. Here Comes Trouble features hilarious and inspirational tales of how one young person’s sense of outrage can change the world. I cannot recommend this book highly enough. I have given lots of copies as gifts to young people.

The Children by David Halberstam

David Halberstam’s vivid history of the Civil Rights movement told through the stories of young people who courageously fought for voting and human rights is a must-read. Today’s young politically conscious young people would be well-served by a reminder that they stand on the shoulders of giants. The Children is one of the all-time great American history books.

For Tweens

We Were There, Too!: Young People in U.S. History by Phillip Hoose

A large lovely book to inspire tweens by the stories of kids and their role in American history.

Protest Songs for Kids

Bigger Than Yourself

John McCutcheon’s delightful record of protest songs for kids will be the hit of car trips and classroom sing-alongs. Every classroom and minivan needs a copy of Bigger Than Yourself!