I’ll be a keynote speaker at the semi-annual Australian Conference on Educational Computing April 6-9, 2010 in my adopted 2nd hometown of Melbourne, Australia.

2010 marks my twentieth anniversary of working in Australia, beginning with the introduction of laptops into schools and ACEC was the first conference I ever keynoted back in 1992, coincidentally in Melbourne.

I’ll also be presiding over a “Breakfast with Gary Stager” workshop in which we’ll explore some of the “Best Educational Ideas in the World” on April 6th. You may register at http://acec2010.info

The organizers of the conference asked me for a video advertising my participation. It ain’t Scorsese, but here it is.

Gary Stager’s ACEC 2010 Video from Gary Stager on Vimeo.

I can’t wait to return to my “second home” in Melbourne to keynote the 2010 Australian Conference on EducationalACEC 2010 Computing Conference, April 6-9, 2010.

2010 marks an important anniversary for me. It represents twenty years of working in schools across Australia. I recently reflected on my the experience of leading professional development at the world’s first two “laptop schools” Downunder in 1990, in Hard and Easy: Reflections on my ancient history in 1:1 computing. That early work was also documented in the book, Never Mind the Laptops…

In 1992, I delivered my first keynote address at the biennial Australian Computers in Education Conference in my beloved Melbourne. That’s why it’s so exciting to be a keynote speaker at this year’s ACEC, April 6-9, 2010 in Melbourne, Australia! I will be presenting a brand new keynote designed specifically for the Australian audience entitled, “You Say You Want a Revolution?”

Sylvia Martinez and Alan November are two of the other keynote speakers.

I will also lead a Q&A session following my keynote and participate in a panel discussion, Diverse Tales from the Digital Crypt – What Effective Computer-Using Educators Know about Teaching: An International Perspective.

Tuesday morning I will host a ticketed breakfast session on creativity, computing and leadership.

The following is the abstract for my new keynote address:

You Say You Want a Revolution?
This keynote will explore the notion of the digital learning revolution and its assumptions while addressing such questions as, “What happened to the last digital revolution in Australia?” Were there lessons learned? If not, why not?

Who are the combatants in this latest revolution? Will children, democracy and creativity be the first casualties.

Gary Stager will reflect upon his experiences of working in Australian schools for the past twenty years and insights gained from similar top-down “reform” efforts being imposed across the United States.

Gary will remind ACEC attendees why he is still excited by the potential of computers in education as intellectual laboratories and vehicles for self-expression and challenge the audience to raise their game in order to realize the opportunities computing affords learners. This of course will be accomplished with humour, candor and provocative examples of student learning.


Resources related to my upcoming keynote address:

I can’t wait to join you at ACEC 2010 this April 6-9 in Melbourne as a keynote speaker. 2010 marks my 20th anniversary of working in Australia and Keynote debate at NECC 2009ACEC ’92 was the first conference I ever keynoted – in Melbourne coincidentally! I’ve been the keynote for at least one other biennial ACEC Conference (perhaps 2), since.

I know how many of my Aussie, Kiwi and other non-American friends had wished they could have voted in US presidential elections – the world might be a better place. However, there is one US election where your vote counts.

I am a finalist to be a keynote speaker at this June’s International Society for Technology in Education Conference (ISTE) in Denver. A keynote speaker will be selected by you, the voter!

This is quite the honor!

The other finalists are Peter Reynolds, Chris Lehmann, Alan November and Jeff Piontek.

Please vote  here (http://bit.ly/3nvfV9)

Voting ends on Friday January 15th (US time). Don’t miss out! Help put the “I” into ISTE!